Category Archives: Drag Queen Architecture

Extreme Makeover c. 1972 “Reimagined” in 2017

History does repeat itself, does it not?  This hapless house has had a hellacious history.  After being stripped of its true identity in the early 70’s and given a quasi-Colonial/Second Empire identity, this tragic structure has now been “reimagined” in a manner utterly void of any stylistic influence at all (save the few surviving remnants of the 70’s makeover).

The fake shutters and broken pediments have been removed (no big loss). The roof has been encased in metal panels and the stucco painted white.  The window casings have been picked out in gray, while the incredibly fake muntins have inexplicably been left white – thereby emphasizing their inherent fakeness.

Yeah, it looks cleaner, but it is still in drag.  Two pairs of “before and after” photos follow….

 

As you last remember, this former house had been turned into an architectural oxymoron and then forgotten for 40-odd years…

 

Imagine my surprise to drive past the place today and see that it has been “reimagined” once again (sans greenery)!

 

As bad as the 1970’s makeover was, I’m not convinced that the newest version is an improvement…

 

At least it looks cared for now…

 

 

 

 

 

Former Italianate Feigns Colonial Past

Looking like something out of a post-war subdivision, this ostensibly Colonial Revival four-plex would have gotten away with its charade if it hadn’t been for those meddling architectural sleuths that happened upon it!  Located just a block away from the gloriously monolithic historic preservation endeavor known as the Cross House, the facade looks a bit newer… Continue Reading

Neo-Mediterranean Makeover of Former Queen Anne

Dating to the 1970’s, this remodeling of a former Queen Anne style house into a Neo-Mediterranean showplace is strangely captivating some 40-odd-years later. The original c. 1900 Queen Anne feautured clapboard siding and boxed eaves which were arched and shingled in the gables for interest.  At some point – possibly in the 1920’s – the clapboard siding… Continue Reading

From Good to Bad to Contrived

When I first photographed this small commercial building I was smitten with its Brutalist / Modernist vibe – not something one expects to find in an obscure corner of “flyover country”.   I loved the concrete, oddball windows and corner emphasis.  I knew it was much too interesting to survive unmolested, so I took this photo to document it.  The second… Continue Reading