Hidden in Plain Sight

At first glance, this mid-20th century storefront seems to be just that; mid-20th century.  A look above the metal canopy shows a Victorian storefront of limestone which has been painted.  The replacement windows are not very compatible with the surrounding historic masonry.

A look through the plate glass of the display windows reveals the original cast iron columns – with a beautiful rope motif – still performing a structural function.  The columns, which were meant to receive the original display windows, have been painted an innocuous beige to downplay their existence.

 

The plate glass display windows probably date to the 1950's.
The plate glass display windows probably date to the 1950’s.

 

The Victorian-era cast iron columns aren't readily apparent unless you are looking for them.
The Victorian-era cast iron columns aren’t readily apparent unless you are looking for them.

 

The building, which likely dates to the late 1870's, features some very beautiful stone work on the facade. The present windows are recent replacements which fail to make use of the spectacular arched opening. The door to the stairwell has been replaced with another stylistically inappropriate choice. It relates to neither the Italianate second story nor the 1950's entry.
The building, which likely dates to the late 1870’s, features some very beautiful and labor-intensive stone work on the facade. The present windows are recent replacements which fail to make use of the spectacular arched opening. The door to the stairwell has been replaced with another stylistically inappropriate choice. It relates to neither the Italianate second story nor the 1950’s entry.

 

2 Responses to Hidden in Plain Sight

  1. Yeah, only to imagine what the window assembly in hat upper story once looked like. The saddest part is it could have lasted centuries with proper maintenance.

  2. I am amazed the lovely columns were allowed to remain visible.

    The upper facade is stunning. Well, the original parts!

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